Recipes

Healthy Butternut Squash “Risotto”

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Butternut squash is slowly cooked and transformed into a form of risotto in this sweet and nourishing recipe. This tasty risotto is easy to make and yet elegant at the same time. The squash is converted into smaller rice-like pieces in much the same way as cauliflower rice, in a food processor. But instead of rice, the squash more closely resembles risotto in the way that it cooks for a long period over low temperature.

Butternut Squash “Risotto”- love this healthy recipe! Uses butternut squash as a substitute for rice.
Serving Size
1
Calories/Serving
266

Butternut Squash “Risotto”- love this healthy recipe! Uses butternut squash as a substitute for rice.



The art of transformation is used daily in cooking. This is especially true for diets, when people will transform their food into healthy replicas of dishes that they were accustomed to in their previous lifestyle. We at Paleo Grubs have had fun with making rice, spaghetti, nachos, and even cake, all suited to fit the dietary requirements of Paleo. These recipes are usually marked with quotation marks to indicate that the recipe is an alteration of the traditional concept. The next dish that I would like to introduce into this category is this delicious recipe for butternut squash ‘risotto’.

While the risotto cooks, make sure to check every so often to see if the pan needs more broth and to stir the squash. If the squash seems to be sticking to the bottom of the pan, simply add a bit more broth while it continues to cook.

cooking it
low carb squash risotto

The first time I made this butternut squash risotto I ate it completely on its own. But similar to traditional risotto, there are many different vegetables that you can feel free to add. I also think that it would be good served alongside a heavier protein such as grilled chicken or even steak. In addition, adding rosemary, sage, or other fresh herbs to the dish contrasts nicely to the bold sweetness of the squash. As the recipe is listed here, it could probably feed at least four people as an entrée.

butternut squash risotto recipe


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Ingredients

    • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
    • 1 tbsp ghee
    • 2 large onions, diced
    • 2 tsp salt
    • 2 butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cubed
    • 1/4 cup white wine vinegar
    • 1 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped
    • 1-2 cups chicken broth

Directions

  1. Heat the olive oil and ghee in a large pot over medium-low heat. Add the onions and salt. Cook for 15-20 until slightly caramelized, stirring occasionally.
  2. Meanwhile, working in batches, place the squash in a food processor and pulse until it reaches a rice-like consistency.
  3. Add the squash to the pan once the onions are caramelized and sauté for 3-4 minutes. Then add the vinegar, parsley, and broth. Cover and cook over medium heat for 30-35 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the squash is completely tender. Add more broth if necessary and adjust the salt to taste. Serve immediately.

Servings

Serving Size

1

Servings/Recipe

4

Nutrition Information

Calories

266

Carbohydrates

39.5 g

Fat

11.4 g

Sugar

10.1 g

Protein

5.6 g

Fiber

6.3 g

Calories 266 kcal
Potassium 1090 mg
Vitamin A 1361.8 µg
Vitamin C 59.5 mg
Folic Acid (B9) 87.7 µg
Sodium 1025 mg

Print Recipe

  1. This was delicious! I had never tried butternut squash before and I ended up substituting rosemary instead of sage based on what I had in the house, but I will definitely be making it again. Thanks for the yummy meal idea – I will link it on my blog’s recipe round-up this Thursday!

  2. Hi, great recipe idea! Maybe I missed this part, but I was wondering if you bake the butternut squash to soften it before pulsing the squash in the food processor. Thanks.

    • I dont think you would bake it before because you are going to cook it for 30 minutes. Plus I always find it easier to make rice out of veggies when they’re not cooked

  3. How does the vinegar work here? Do you taste? I just wasn’t sure of its role and if it’s sting the kids may not go for it as readily. Thanks!

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